Saturday, March 11, 2017

CQJP 2017 February Block Motif 1





My CQJP 2017 February block was pieced last month.

I pieced the CQJP 2017 March block at the same time.

Both blocks will be used as pockets on tote bags. One will be donated for an auction next month and the other will be added to my (currently empty) Etsy shop inventory.

For the first motif on the February block, I traced a reverse image of a seahorse on the muslin backing of the block. 

Next, I followed the traced lines with a split stitch and used a satin stitch to complete the seahorse. (I like using the split stitch to give a cleaner edge to the satin stitches.)

Stomach area: 1 strand of DMC #4040.
Body: 1 strand of Waterlilies by Caron #207 Bermuda Reef (I think I fell in love with using silk embroidery floss!)
Eye: 1 strand of DMC #310
Center of eye: straight stitch of size 12 DMC perle cotton #B5200 floss.

It may be difficult to see, but here is a sneak peek at the 2nd motif. I will be using the octopus from the Stitcher's Revolution SR10 Sailor's Delight Iron-On Transfer set.

The last time I embroidered an octopus, it took me about 10 hours. I am hoping to be a little faster this time. You may see the octopus added to Sandy's block in a round robin here

I usually embellish the seams and then begin adding motifs to my crazy quilt blocks. To make sure the seams will not interfere with the motifs I want to add, I am working the motifs first.

Related blog posts:
Seahorse Tutorial (I used Seahorse 1 Sketch for this piece.)
CQJP 2017 January Block

The Pinterest board documenting my CQJP 2017 project may be found here.

I sometimes share sneak peeks on my Instagram account and on my Hand Stitched Treasure Facebook Page.

CQJP stands for Crazy Quilt Journal Project. It is a personal challenge to complete one crazy quilt block a month measuring a minimum of 8-inches by 8-inches. You may learn more about the rules here and see the blocks that have been completed this year here.

Thank you for stopping by!
Renee


13 comments:

desertskyquilts said...

The seahorse is great, but I'm looking forward to seeing the octopus, too. This is going to be such a great block!

Createology said...

This looks like a wonderful beach block. I love your Seahorse. Ten hours for an octopus sounds like an eternity. Your CQ stitches are amazing dear. Serene Sunday to You...<3

Christine B. said...

Your seahorse is just beautiful Renee! I love the design and the colours you used... just perfect! Christine x

Queeniepatch said...

Wow! When I first saw the sea horse I thought it was a machine stitched iron on badge - the stitches seemed so heavy. On closer inspection it is obvious it is a beautifully hand stitched sea horse. The Split stitch helps make the edges perfect and you have added just the right amount of Satin stitches.
I think the octopus will be another great motif.

Carol- Beads and Birds said...

Perfectly laid stitches! I loved your last octopus, so I can't wait to see this one too.
Lovely blocks for a UTS theme.
xx, Carol

Brigitte said...

Your little seahorse looks perfect. And you also chose the perfect colours for it. Great start of the block.

Catherine said...

I love sea horses and you've got such a great one here! I love the colours. You always have such wonderful colour selections!

Katie said...

You have to stop doing ocean themed pieces. I just scream at my computer about how cute they are. Love the seahorse! So cute!! Good luck with the octopus. Can't wait to see it.

Renee said...

Catherine, thank you so much! I enjoy creating the seahorses. As for the colour selections, I found some fun flosses while participating in the under-the-sea round robins. It looks like I need to replace a few soon.

Diane said...

My gosh what an adorable seahorse Renee.

Hugs Diane

Laura said...

As usual, I'm behind on my blog reading. Love the seahorse! Fun Fact: I grew up on Sea Horse Way.

Magpie's Mumblings said...

Your little seahorse looks so cute, but he's lonely and needs some more friends to play with. I'm sure he'd like the octopus!

Renee said...

Thank you, Diane!